C A R E E R   P A T H

The Career path actually falls under the direction of the Game Master and not the Players. The GM must decide how the game will be played—which path the game will take. Since the Players (assuming more than one) will be together as a team, they must all choose the same Career Path. The GM may wish, to challenge herself, to have the group chose their own path, as long as they are all the same. To make them different means the group would have different careers, and thus have no reason to work together. This is not the path the characters were before but what they are doing when the game begins. The GM may elect each PC to choose their own career and have them move into a new unified one as the game begins, but they receive no benefits from their past careers, only the new one. These benefits take effect as the game is played.

C O R P O R A T E
Being tied to a corporation brings many benefits. One has access to the top technology. One can flaunt power unprecedented. However, when one joins a corporation, they seldom can ever leave. Servitude requires unflinching loyalty under a massive hierarchal structure. Seldom are characters independent. Corporations always want to know where their money is being invested. Uniforms are mandatory. Tasks include mostly escort and protection of important corporate heads. They may also be assigned retrieval jobs to bring back important information or rival company defectors.
Benefits: Cybernetics gain free periodic servicing. May access mission specific equipment (no more than +10% of groups total XP Value). Player may also take a 25% discount to all cybernetics under condition that the player sign a contract with the corporation, demanding all discounted purchased be returned if the Player were ever to leave the corporation. Group must be all be tied to the same corporation. Players also gain access to the corporations information network.

L A W     E N F O R C E M E N T
The players are members of an elite SWAT or investigation division. One Player may be promoted to a higher rank to control the group or they can all answer to a Lieutenant. There will always be authority above. Jobs include primarily investigation and apprehension. The GM should choose a division the players would be under. They may work for Treasury or Cybercrime or the basics (Homicide, Drug Enforcement, etc).
Benefits: +1 level Contact Advantage (If the PC already has a 200 XP, contact, it becomes a 400 XP Advantage for free, etc). May access mission specific equipment (no more than +15% of groups total XP Value).

M E R C
Mercenaries are independent military groups with no affiliation to any government of sovereignty. They answer only to the almighty dollar and can find their work from the jungles of South America to the urban decay of New Tokyo. They sport the highest quality of cybernetics and weaponry although full body prosthetics are somewhat rarer. They have a commander (PC or not) that accepts the jobs and passes it to the group. They have to be responsible for every facet of their group—from buying weapons, the purchasing food.
Benefits: Commander must be old enough to receive the Seasoned advantage, which she gets free. Group gains an Ally and an Enemy of equal value free.

M I L I T A R Y
The group is either part of a larger squad or a crack unit. They operate mostly outside of normal borders, sometimes on the other side of the planet or maybe across the sea. They may be called to quell unrest in Japan, but this should be a rarity. Refer to the SDF section for more information.
Benefits: Full servicing for all cybernetics. Access to mission specific equipment (no more than +15% of groups total XP value.

P U B L I C     S E C U R I T Y
The group works for the one of the sections of Public Security. They could answer to Aramaki in Section 9 or one of the lesser-known sections (some are unaccounted for so a GM could invent it). They must understand the chain of command and respect it at all times. They must follow the charter of Public Security and the specific Section they are employed under. This means they operate mostly within the jurisdiction of Japan.
Benefits: Cybernetics gain free periodic servicing. Access to all known weaponry in combat loadoat (all personal weapons must still be purchased). May access mission specific equipment (no more than +10% of groups total XP Value). Player may also take a 25% discount to all cybernetics under condition that the player sign a contract with Public Security, demanding all discounted purchased be returned to the Player were ever to leave Public Security. Refer to the Public Security Section for more information.

S T R E E T     G A N G
Members are a complete gang or members of a larger group. They are selfish—only dealing with the power of their own gang and the occupation of their turf. They may operate from a front, which may or may not turn a profit. Jobs are usually ones players make up themselves. They may allied to the Yakuza in a minor degree. They fight with other gangs and try to keep off the radar of the police or Public Security.
Benefits: Group gets a +500 XP Ally Advantage on top of any other advantages they have.

Y A K U Z A
The group work for one of the many organized crime syndicates around Japan. Their loyalty may be in question, but their obedience must be absolute. They may operate from a from a front—a location devoid of suspicion (a bar, a store, etc) where they receive missions from their boss. These can include protection of their hierarchy to attacks on other organizations.
Benefits: 15% off all equipment purchases except for cybernetics.

N E W     S K I L L S

SKILL

ABILITY

UNTRAINED

ACTION

Computer Use

Int

Yes

Special

Craft chemical

Int

No

Special

electronic

Int

No

Special

mechanical

Int

No

Special

pharmaceutical

Int

No

Special

structural

Int

Yes

Special

visual art

Int

Yes

Special

writing

Int

Yes

Special

Demolitions

Int

No

Full / Special

Drive

Dex

Yes

Move

Gamble

Wis

Yes

Special

Hackcraft

Int

Yes

Special

Knowledge

Int

No

React or Full

Navigate

Int

Yes

Full / Special

Pilot

Dex

No

Move

Read / Write Language

None

No

--

Repair

Int

No

Full / Special

Research

Int

Yes

Special

Treat Injury

Wis

Yes

Special

C O M P U T E R     U S E (Int)
Check: Most normal computer operations don’t require a Computer Use check (though a character might have to make a Research check; see the Research skill description). However, searching an unfamiliar network for a particular file, writing computer programs, altering existing programs to perform differently (better or worse), and breaking through computer security are all relatively difficult and require skill checks.
In the world of Ghost in the Shell, it no longer deals with the typing of keyboards and the reading of computer screens but in the instantaneously transfer of information from one area to the next. It deals with all forms of hacking, into computers and cyberbrains. In the world of Ghost in the Shell, its as important a skill to all involved as Hide is to a Rogue in D&D.
Special: A character can take 10 when using the Computer Use skill only when doing regular work. A character cannot take 10 or 20 with Barrier actions. A character can take 20 in some cases, but not in those that involve a penalty for failure. There are several feats and classes that increase this skill. Refer to the Hacking section for details beyond what is explained here.
Time: Most Computer Use checks requires at least a full-round action. The GM may determine that some tasks require several rounds, a few minutes, or longer, as described above.

C R A F T (chemical) (Int) Trained Only
This skill allows a character to mix chemicals to create acids, bases, explosives, and poisonous substances.
Acids and Bases: Acids are corrosives substances. Bases neutralize acids but do not deal damage. A base of a certain type counteracts an acid of the same type or a less potent type.

   

Craft DCs

 

Type of Acid

Purchase price

Acid

Base

Time

Mild (1d6/1d10) 1

70

15

10

1 min.

Potent (2d6/2d10)

200

20

15

30 min.

Concentrated (3d6/3d10)

450

30

20

1 hr.

1 The dice rolls in parentheses are typical contact damage/immersion damage caused per round of immersion.

Explosives: Building an explosive from scratch is dangerous. If the Craft (chemical) check fails, the raw materials are wasted. If the check fails by 5 or more, the explosive compound detonates as it is being made, dealing half of its intended damage to the builder and anyone else in the burst radius.
If the check succeeds, the final product is a solid material, about the size of a brick. An explosive compound does not include a fuse or detonator. Connecting a fuse or detonator requires a Demolitions check.

Type of Scratch-Built Explosive

Purchase Price

Craft DC

Reflex DC (save for half damage)

Time

Improvised (1d6/5 feet) 1

40

10

10

1 round

Simple (2d6/5 feet)

200

15

12

10 min.

Moderate (4d6/10 feet)

650

20

12

1 hr.

Complex (6d6/15 feet)

2000

25

15

3 hr.

Powerful (8d6/20 feet)

9000

30

15

12 hr.

Devastating (10d6/25 feet)

35000

35

18

24 hr.

1 The figures in parentheses are typical damage/burst radius for each type of explosive.

Scratch built explosives deal concussion damage.
Poisonous Substances : Solid poisons are usually ingested. Liquid poisons are most effective when injected directly into the bloodstream. Gaseous poisons must be inhaled to be effective. The table below summarizes the characteristics of various poisons.

Table: Poisons

Poison

Type

Save DC

Initial Damage

Secondary Damage

Purchase Price

Restriction

Craft DC

Time

Arsenic

Ingested

15

1d4 Str

2d4 Con

90

Res (+2)

24

4 hr.

Atropine

Injury

13

1d6 Dex

1d6 Str

12

Res (+2)

14

1 hr.

Belladonna (plant)

Injury

18

1d6 Str

2d6 Str

300

Lic (+1)

n/a

n/a

Blue vitriol

Injury

12

1d2 Con

1d2 Con

12

Res (+2)

9

1 hr.

Blue-ringed octopus venom

Injury

15

1d4 Con

1d4 Con

300

Lic (+1)

n/a

n/a

Chloral hydrate

Ingested

18

1d6 Dex

Unconsciousness 1d3 hours

12

Res (+2)

28

8 hr.

Chloroform 1

Inhaled

17

Unconsciousness 1d3 hours

90

Res (+2)

24

4 hr.

Curare (plant)

Injury

18

2d4 Dex

2d4 Wis

400

Res (+2)

n/a

n/a

Cyanide

Injury

16

1d6 Con

2d6 Con

400

Mil (+3)

31

15 hr.

Cyanogen

Inhaled

19

1d4 Dex

2d4 Con

150

Mil (+3)

28

8 hr.

DDT

Inhaled

17

1d2 Str

1d4 Str

90

Lic (+1)

20

4 hr.

Knockout gas

Inhaled

18

1d3 Dex

Unconsciousness 1d3 hours

200

Res (+2)

26

8 hr.

Lead arsenate (gas)

Inhaled

12

1d2 Str

1d4 Con

40

Res (+2)

17

2 hr.

Lead arsenate (solid)

Ingested

12

1d2 Con

1d4 Con

40

Res (+2)

18

2 hr.

Mustard gas

Inhaled

17

1d4 Con

2d4 Con

200

Mil (+3)

26

8 hr.

Paris green (gas)

Inhaled

14

1d2 Con

1d4 Con

90

Res (+2)

20

4 hr.

Paris green (solid)

Ingested

14

1d4 Con

1d4 Con

90

Res (+2)

24

4 hr.

Puffer poison (fish)

Injury

13

1d6 Str

Paralysis 2d6 minutes

260

Lic (+1)

n/a

n/a

Rattlesnake venom

Injury

12

1d6 Con

1d6 Con

200

Lic (+1)

n/a

n/a

Sarin nerve gas

Inhaled

18

1d4 Con

2d4 Con

500

Illegal (+4)

30

15 hr.

Scorpion/tarantula venom

Injury

11

1d2 Str

1d2 Str

200

Lic (+1)

n/a

n/a

Strychnine

Injury

19

1d3 Dex

2d4 Con

90

Res (+2)

23

4 hr.

Tear gas

Inhaled

15

Nauseated 1d6 rounds

90

Res (+2) 21

4 hr.

VX nerve gas

Inhaled

22

1d6 Con

2d6 Con

2000

Illegal (+4)

42

48 hr.

1 Chloroform gives off vapor that causes unconsciousness. Applying chloroform to an unwilling subject requires a successful grapple check and pin.

n/a: Certain poisons can’t be made with the Craft skill. Instead, such a poison must be obtained by extracting it from the creature in question.

Save DC: The Difficulty Class of the Fortitude save to negate the effects of the poison.
Initial Damage: The damage a character takes immediately upon failing his or her Fortitude save.
Secondary Damage: The damage a character takes after 1 minute of exposure to the poison if the character fails a second saving throw. Ability score damage is temporary, unless marked with an asterisk, in which case the damage is permanent ability drain. Unconsciousness lasts for 1d3 hours, and paralysis lasts 2d6 minutes.
Purchase Price: T o obtain the raw materials to craft the poison, or to purchase one bottle of solid or liquid poison or one high-pressure cylinder of gaseous poison. A bottle holds four doses, while a cylinder holds enough gas to fill a 10-foot-radius area.
Restriction: The restriction rating for the poison, if any, and the appropriate black market purchase modifier. (+1 = +10%, +2 = +20%, +3 = +30%, +4 = +40%). Apply this modifier to the purchase price when acquiring the poison on the black market.
Craft DC: The DC of the Craft check to create a quantity of the poison.
Time: The amount of time required for the Craft check.
If the Craft check succeeds, the final product is a synthesized solid or liquid poison stored in a bottle (containing 4 doses) or a gas stored in a pressurized cylinder. When released, the gas is sufficient to fill a 10-foot-radius area and takes 1 round to fill the area.
Special: A character without a chemical kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (chemical) checks.
A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (chemical) checks.

C R A F T (electronic) (Int) Trained Only
This skill allows a character to build electronic equipment from scratch, such as audio and video equipment, timers and listening devices, or radios and communication devices.
When building an electronic device from scratch, the character describes the kind of device he or she wants to construct; then the Gamemaster decides whether the device is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced com­pared to current technology.

Type of Scratch-Built Electronics (Examples)

Purchase Price

Craft DC

Time

Simple (timer or detonator)

70

15

1 hr.

Moderate (radio direction finder, electronic lock)

150

20

12 hr.

Complex (cell phone)

500

25

24 hr.

Advanced (computer)

3000

30

60 hr.

Special: A character without an electrical tool kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (electronic) checks.
A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (electronic) checks.

C R A F T (mechanical) (Int) Trained Only
This skill allows a character to build mechanical devices from scratch, including engines and engine parts, weapons, armor, and other gadgets. When building a mechanical device from scratch, the character describes the kind of device he or she wants to construct; then the Gamemaster decides if the device is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced compared to current technology.

Type of Scratch-Built Mechanical Device (Examples)

Purchase Price

Craft DC

Time

Simple (tripwire trap)

30

15

1 hr

Moderate (engine component, light armor)

200

20

12 hr.

Complex (automobile engine, 9mm autoloader handgun)

600

25

24 hr.

Advanced (jet engine)

1800

30

60 hr.

Special: A character without a mechanical tool kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (mechanical) checks. A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (mechanical) checks.

C R A F T (pharmaceutical) (Int) Trained Only
This skill allows a character to compound medicinal drugs to aid in recovery from treatable illnesses. A medicinal drug gives a +2 circumstance bonus on Fortitude saves made to resist the effects of a disease. The Craft (pharmaceutical) check is based on the severity of the disease to be countered as measured by the DC of the Fortitude save needed to resist it.

Disease Fortitude Save DC

Purchase Price

Craft DC

Time

14 or lower

30

15

1 hr.

15–18

120

20

3 hr.

19–22

450

25

6 hr.

23 or higher

1800

30

12 hr.

Special: A character without a pharmacist kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (pharmaceutical) checks. A character with the Medical Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (pharmaceutical) checks.

C R A F T (structural) (Int)
This skill allows a character to build wooden, concrete, or metal structures from scratch, including bookcases, desks, walls, houses, and so forth, and includes such handyman skills as plumbing, house painting, drywall, laying cement, and building cabinets.

Type of Scratch-Built Structure (Examples)

Purchase Price

Craft DC

Time

Simple (bookcase, false wall)

30

15

12 hr.

Moderate (catapult, shed, house deck)

120

20

24 hr.

Complex (bunker, domed ceiling)

480

25

60 hr.

Advanced (house)

2000

30

600 hr.

When building a structure from scratch, the character describes the kind of structure he or she wants to construct; then the Gamemaster decides if the structure is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced in scope and difficulty.
Special: A character without a mechanical tool kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (structural) checks.
A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (structural) checks.

Skill Check Result

Effort Achieved

9 or lower

Untalented amateur

10–19

Talented amateur

20–24

Professional

25–30

Expert

31 or higher

Master

C R A F T (visual art) (Int)
This skill allows a character to create paintings or drawings, take photographs, use a video camera, or in some other way create a work of visual art. When attempting to create a work of visual art, the character simply makes a Craft (visual art) check, the result of which determines the quality of the work.
Unless the effort is particularly elaborate or the character must acquire an expensive piece of equipment, the basic components have a purchase price of $30.
Creating a work of visual art requires at least a full-round action, but usually takes an hour, a day, or more, depending on the scope of the project.
Special: A character with the Creative feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (visual art) checks.

Skill Check Result

Effort Achieved

9 or lower

Untalented amateur

10–19

Talented amateur

20–24

Professional

25–30

Expert

31 or higher

Master

C R A F T (writing) (Int)
This skill allows a character to create short stories, novels, scripts and screenplays, newspaper articles and columns, and similar works of writing. When creating a work of writing, the player simply makes a Craft (writing) check, the result of which determines the quality of the work.
Creating a work of writing requires at least 1 hour, but usually takes a day, a week, or more, depending on the scope of the project.
Special: A character with the Creative feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (writing) checks.

D E M O L I T I O N S (Int) Trained Only
Check:
Setting a simple explosive to blow up at a certain spot doesn’t require a check, but connecting and setting a detonator does. Also, placing an explosive for maximum effect against a structure calls for a check, as does disarming an explosive device.
Set Detonator: Most explosives require a detonator to go off. Connecting a detonator to an explosive requires a Demolitions check (DC 10). Failure means that the explosive fails to go off as planned. Failure by 10 or more means the explosive goes off as the detonator is being installed.
A character can make an explosive difficult to disarm. To do so, the character chooses the disarm DC before making his or her check to set the detonator (it must be higher than 10). The character’s DC to set the detonator is equal to the disarm DC.
Place Explosive Device: Carefully placing an explosive against a fixed structure (a stationary, unattended inanimate object) can maximize the damage dealt by exploiting vulnerabilities in the structure’s construction.
The GM makes the check (so that the character doesn’t know exactly how well he or she has done). On a result of 15 or higher, the explosive deals double damage to the structure against which it is placed. On a result of 25 or higher, it deals triple damage to the structure. In all cases, it deals normal damage to all other targets within its burst radius.
Disarm Explosive Device: Disarming an explosive that has been set to go off requires a Demolitions check. The DC is usually 10, unless the person who set the detonator chose a higher disarm DC. If the character fails the check, he or she does not disarm the explosive. If the character fails by more than 5, the explosive goes off.
Special: A character can take 10 when using the Demolitions skill, but can’t take 20.
A character with the Cautious feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Demolitions checks. A character without a demolitions kit takes a –4 penalty on Demolitions checks.
Making an explosive requires the Craft (chemical) skill. See that skill description for details.
Time: Setting a detonator is usually a full-round action. Placing an explosive device takes 1 minute or more, depending on the scope of the job.

D R I V E (Dex)
Check:
Routine tasks, such as ordinary driving, don’t require a skill check. Make a check only when some unusual circumstance exists (such as inclement weather or an icy surface), or when the character is driving during a dramatic situation (the character is being chased or attacked, for example, or is trying to reach a destination in a limited amount of time). When driving, the character can attempt simple maneuvers or stunts. See Driving a Vehicle for more details.
Try Again?: Most driving checks have consequences for failure that make trying again impossible.
Special: A character can take 10 when driving, but can’t take 20. A character with the Vehicle Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Drive checks. There is no penalty for operating a general-purpose motor vehicle. Other types of motor vehicles (heavy wheeled, powerboat, sailboat, ship, and tracked) require the corresponding Surface Vehicle Operation feat, or the character takes a –4 penalty on Drive checks.
Time: A Drive check is a move action.

G A M B L E (Wis)
Check:
To join or start a game, a character must first pay a stake. The character sets the purchase price of the stake if he or she starts the game, or the GM sets it if the character joins a game. Stakes run from penny-ante ($20) to astronomical ($10 000). The character’s Gamble check is opposed by the Gamble checks of all other participants in the game. If there are many characters participating, the GM can opt to make a single roll for all of them, using the highest Gamble skill modifier among them and adding a +2 bonus to the check.
If the character beats all other participants, he or she wins.
Try Again?: No, unless the character wants to put up another stake.
Special: A character can’t take 10 or take 20 when making a Gamble check. A character with the Confident feat gets a +2 bonus on all Gamble checks.
Time: A Gamble check requires 1 hour.

H A C K C R A C F T (Int)
The Normal citizens of the world, never try to disturb the status quo. For those attempting to alter the world, there is HackCraft. HackCraft epitomizes all the talent of the Hacker. After breaking through barriers, HackCraft takes over and starts fishing around, altering and deleting. It is the skill used to accomplish all the Hack Action at the back of this book.
Check: HackCraft is used for all Hacking Actions as well as checks to identify a specific Hack. The DCs for Hackcraft checks relating to various tasks are summarized on the table above. One must be aware they are being attacked to make a Hackcraft check.
Special: A character cannot take neither 10 nor 20 with Hack Craft
Time: Hack Craft times depend on the action being attempted (se later).
Synergy: If you have 5 or more ranks in Computer Use, you get a +2 bonus on Hackcraft checks.
NOTE: Hackcraft is neither a trained nor a unique skill. It is suggested that everyone take one rank in it. This removes the –4 penalty and offers up the synergy bonus from Computer use (which everyone should have at least 5 ranks in anyway). This gives everyone the capacity for at least limite hacking, not just the Hackers themselves. This is a staple of this setting.

Hackcraft DC

Task

10 + ¼ attack Hack DC

(round up)

To identify a hack attack after the effect has passed and its presense is known. Full round action.

20

Identify a virus composition (its effects) when it has been located. Full minute action.

20 + Barrier Level

Identify a Barrier difficulty and its defense. Roll for each level. Full minute action. One must penetrate one barrier to find out what is underneath.

20 + 1/2 attack Hack DC

Identify a hack type as it is being attempted. One must be aware of the attempt.

25

Identify a computer virus, trojan horse, or toy bomb.

30 or higher

Understand a strange or unique AI or

K N O W L E D G E (Int) Trained Only
This skill encompasses several categories, each of them treated as a separate skill. These categories are identified and defined below.
The number of Knowledge categories is kept purposely finite. When trying to determine what Knowledge skill a particular question or field of expertise falls under, use a broad interpretation of the existing categories. Do not arbitrarily make up new categories.
Check: A character makes a Knowledge check to see if the character knows something.
The DC for answering a question within the character’s field of study is 10 for easy questions, 15 for basic questions, and 20 to 30 for tough questions. Appraising the value of an object is one sort of task that can be performed using Knowledge. The DC depends on how common or obscure the object is. On a success, the character accurately identifies the object’s purchase DC. If the character fails, he or she thinks it has a purchase DC 1d2 higher or lower (determine randomly) than its actual value. If the character fails by 5 or more, he or she thinks it has a purchase DC 1d4+2 higher or lower than its actual value. The GM may make the Knowledge roll for the character, so he or she doesn’t know whether the appraisal is accurate or not.
The fourteen Knowledge categories, and the topics each one encompasses, are as follows.
Arcane Lore: The occult, magic and the supernatural, astrology, numerology, and similar topics.
Art: Fine arts and graphic arts, including art history and artistic techniques. Antiques, modern art, photography, and performance art forms such as music and dance, among others.
Behavioral Sciences: Psychology, sociology, and criminology.
Business: Business procedures, investment strategies, and corporate structures. Bureaucratic procedures and how to navigate them.
Civics: Law, legislation, litigation, and legal rights and obligations. Political and governmental institutions and processes.
Current Events: Recent happenings in the news, sports, politics, entertainment, and foreign affairs.
Earth and Life Sciences: Biology, botany, genetics, geology, and paleontology. Medicine and forensics.
History: Events, personalities, and cultures of the past. Archaeology and antiquities.
Physical Sciences: Astronomy, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and engineering.
Popular Culture: Popular music and personalities, genre films and books, urban legends, comics, science fiction, and gaming, among others.
Streetwise: Street and urban culture, local underworld personalities and events.
Tactics: Techniques and strategies for disposing and maneuvering forces in combat.
Technology: Current developments in cutting-edge devices, as well as the background necessary to identify various technological devices.
Theology and Philosophy: Liberal arts, ethics, philosophical concepts, and the study of religious faith, practice, and experience.
Try Again?: No. The check represents what a character knows, and thinking about a topic a second time doesn’t let the character know something he or she never knew in the first place.
Special: An untrained Knowledge check is simply an Intelligence check. Without actual training, a character only knows common knowledge about a given subject. A character can take 10 when making a Knowledge check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Educated feat gets a +2 bonus on any two types of Knowledge checks. The GM may decide that having 5 or more ranks in a specific Knowledge skill provides a character with a +2 synergy bonus when making a related skill check.
Time: A Knowledge check can be a reaction, but otherwise requires a full-round action.

Length of Trip

DC

Short (a few hours) 20

Moderate (a day or two)

22

Long (up to a week)

25

Extreme (more than a week)

28

N A V I G A T E (Int)
Check:
Make a Navigate check when a character is trying to find his or her way to a distant location without directions or other specific guidance. Generally, a character does not need to make a check to find a local street or other common urban site, or to follow an accurate map. However, the character might make a check to wend his or her way through a dense forest or a labyrinth of underground storm drains. For movement over a great distance, make a Navigate check. The DC depends on the length of the trip. If the character succeeds, he or she moves via the best reasonable course toward his or her goal. If the character fails, he or she still reaches the goal, but it takes the character twice as long (the character loses time backtracking and correcting his or her path). If the character fails by more than 5, the or she travels the expected time, but only gets halfway to his or her destination, at which point the character becomes lost.
A character may make a second Navigate check (DC 20) to regain his or her path. If the character succeeds, he or she continues on to his or her destination; the total time for the trip is twice the normal time. If the character fails, he or she loses half a day before the character can try again. The character keeps trying until he or she succeeds, losing half a day for each failure.
When faced with multiple choices, such as at a branch in a tunnel, a character can make a Navigate check (DC 20) to intuit the choice that takes the character toward a known destination. If unsuccessful, the character chooses the wrong path, but at the next juncture, with a successful check, the character realizes his or her mistake. A character cannot use this function of Navigate to find a path to a site if the character has no idea where the site is located. The GM may choose to make the Navigate check for the character in secret, so he or she doesn’t know from the result whether the character is following the right or wrong path.
A character can use Navigate to determine his or her position on earth without the use of any high-tech equipment by checking the constellations or other natural landmarks. The character must have a clear view of the night sky to make this check. The DC is 15.
Special: A character can take 10 when making a Navigate check. A character can take 20 only when determining his or her location, not when traveling.
A character with the Guide feat gets a +2 bonus on all Navigate checks.
Time: A Navigate check is a full-round action.

P I L O T (Dex) Trained Only
Check:
Typical piloting tasks don’t require checks. Checks are required during combat, for special maneuvers, or in other extreme circumstances, or when the pilot wants to attempt something outside the normal parameters of the vehicle. When flying, the character can attempt simple maneuvers and stunts (actions in which the pilot attempts to do something complex very quickly or in a limited space). Each vehicle’s description includes a maneuver modifier that applies to Pilot checks made by the operator of the vehicle.
Special: A character can take 10 when making a Pilot check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Vehicle Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Pilot checks. There is no penalty for operating a general-purpose fixed-wing aircraft. Other types of aircraft (heavy aircraft, helicopters, jet fighters, and spacecraft) require the corresponding Aircraft Operation feat, or else the character takes a –4 penalty on Pilot checks.
Time: A Pilot check is a move action.

R E A D / W R I T E     L A N G U A G E (None) Trained Only
The Read/Write Language skill doesn’t work like a standard skill.
• A character automatically knows how to read and write his or her native language; the character does not need ranks to do so.
• Each additional language costs 1 rank. When a character adds a rank to Read/Write Language, he or she chooses a new language that the character can read and write.
• A character never makes Read/Write Language checks. A character either knows how to read and write a specific language or doesn’t.
• To be able to speak a language that the character can read and write, he or she must take the Speak Language skill for the appropriate language.
• A character can choose any language, modern or ancient. (See below for suggestions.) The GM might determine that a character can’t learn a specific language due to the circumstances of the campaign.
Language Groups: There are thousands of languages to choose from when a character buys ranks in Speak Language or Read/Write Language. A few are listed here, sorted into their general language groups. A language’s group doesn’t matter when a character is buying ranks in Speak Language or Read/Write Language. This list is by no means exhaustive—there are many more language groups, and most groups contain more languages than those listed here.
Algic: Algonkin, Arapaho, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Shawnee.
Armenian: Armenian.
Athabascan: Apache, Chipewyan, Navaho.
Attic: Ancient Greek*, Greek.
Baltic: Latvian, Lithuanian.
Celtic: Gaelic (Irish), Gaelic (Scots), Welsh.
Chinese: Cantonese, Mandarin.
Finno-Lappic: Estonian, Finnish, Lapp.
Germanic: Afrikaans, Danish, Dutch, English, Flemish, German, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Yiddish.
Hamo-Semitic: Coptic*, Middle Egyptian*.
Indic: Hindi, Punjabi, Sanskrit*, Urdu.
Iranian: Farsi, Pashto.
Japanese: Japanese.
Korean: Korean.
Romance: French, Italian, Latin*, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish.
Semitic: Akkadian (aka Babylonian)*, Ancient Hebrew*, Arabic, Aramaic*, Hebrew.
Slavic: Belorussian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Ukrainian.
Tibeto-Burman: Burmese, Sherpa, Tibetan.
Turkic: Azerbaijani, Turkish, Uzbek.
Ugric : Hungarian (aka Magyar).
*This is an ancient language. In the modern world it is spoken only by scholars, or in some cases by small populations in isolated corners of the world.
Cybernetic implants can offer translations to most languages as well. (See later)

R E P A I R (Int) Trained Only
Check:
Most Repair checks are made to fix complex electronic or mechanical devices. The DC is set by the GM. In general, simple repairs have a DC of 10 to 15 and require no more than a few minutes to accomplish. More complex repair work has a DC of 20 or higher and can require an hour or more to complete. Making repairs also involves a monetary cost when spare parts or new components are needed.
If the GM decides this isn’t necessary for the type of repair the character is attempting, then no price is needed.

Repair Task (Example)

Purchase DC

Repair DC

Time

Simple (tool, simple weapon)

20

10

1 min.

Moderate (mechanical or electronic component)

55

15

10 min.

Complex (mechanical or electronic device)

120

20

1 hr.

Advanced (cutting-edge mechanical or electronic device)

275

25

10 hr.

Jury-Rig: A character can choose to attempt jury-rigged, or temporary, repairs. Doing this reduces the purchase price by 30% and the Repair check DC by 5, and allows the character to make the checks in as little as a full-round action. However, a jury-rigged repair can only fix a single problem with a check, and the temporary repair only lasts until the end of the current scene or encounter. The jury-rigged object must be fully repaired thereafter.
A character can also use jury-rig to hot-wire a car or jump-start an engine or electronic device. The DC for this is at least 15, and it can be higher depending on the presence of security devices.
The jury-rig application of the Repair skill can be used untrained.
Try Again?: Yes, though in some specific cases, the GM may decide that a failed Repair check has negative ramifications that prevent repeated checks.
Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 on a Repair check. When making a Repair check to accomplish a jury-rig repair, a character can’t take 20. Repair requires an electrical tool kit, a mechanical tool kit, or a multipurpose tool, depending on the task. If the character do not have the appropriate tools, he or she takes a –4 penalty on the check. Craft (mechanical) or Craft (electronic) can provide a +2 synergy bonus on Repair checks made for mechanical or electronic devices (see Skill Synergy). A character with the Gearhead feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Repair checks.
Time: See the table for guidelines. A character can make a jury-rig repair as a full-round action, but the work only lasts until the end of the current encounter.

R E S E A R C H (Int)
Check:
Researching a topic takes time, skill, and some luck. The GM determines how obscure a particular topic is (the more obscure, the higher the DC) and what kind of information might be available depending on where the character is conducting his or her research. Information ranges from general to protected. Given enough time (usually 1d4 hours) and a successful skill check, the character gets a general idea about a given topic. This assumes that no obvious reasons exist why such information would be unavailable, and that the character has a way to acquire restricted or protected information.
The higher the check result, the better and more complete the information. If the character wants to discover a specific fact, date, map, or similar bit of information, add +5 to +15 to the DC.
Try Again?: Yes.
Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 on a Research check. A character with the Studious feat gets a +2 bonus on all Research checks. Computer Use can provide a +2 synergy bonus on a Research check when searching computer records for data (see Skill Synergy).
Time: A Research check takes 1d4 hours.

T R E A T     I N J U R Y (Wis)
Check:
The DC and effect depend on the task attempted. Long-Term Care (DC 15): With a medical kit, the successful application of this skill allows a patient to recover hit points and ability points lost to temporary damage at an advanced rate—3 hit points per character level or 3 ability points restored per day of complete rest. A new check is made each day; on a failed check, recovery occurs at the normal rate for that day of rest and care. A character can tend up to as many patients as he or she has ranks in the skill. The patients need complete bed rest (doing nothing all day). The character needs to devote at least ½ hour of the day to each patient the character is caring for.
Restore Hit Points (DC 15): With a medical kit, if a character has lost hit points, the character can restore some of them. A successful check, as a full-round action, restores 1d4 hit points. The number restored can never exceed the character’s full normal total of hit points. This application of the skill can be used successfully on a character only once per day.
Revive Dazed, Stunned, or Unconscious Character (DC 15): With a first aid kit, the character can remove the dazed, stunned, or unconscious condition from a character. This check is an attack action.
A successful check removes the dazed, stunned, or unconscious condition from an affected character. The character can’t revive an unconscious character who is at –1 hit points or lower without first stabilizing the character.
Stabilize Dying Character (DC 15): With a medical kit, a character can tend to a character who is dying. As an attack action, a successful Treat Injury check stabilizes another character. The stabilized character regains no hit points, but he or she stops losing them. The character must have a medical kit to stabilize a dying character.
Surgery (DC 20): With a surgery kit, a character can conduct field surgery. This application of the Treat Injury skill carries a –4 penalty, which can be negated with the Surgery feat. Surgery requires 1d4 hours; if the patient is at negative hit points, add an additional hour for every point below 0 the patient has fallen.
Surgery restores 1d6 hit points for every character level of the patient (up to the patient’s full normal total of hit points) with a successful skill check. Surgery can only be used successfully on a character once in a 24-hour period. A character who undergoes surgery is fatigued for 24 hours, minus 2 hours for every point above the DC the surgeon achieves. The period of fatigue can never be reduced below 6 hours in this fashion.
Treat Disease (DC 15): A character can tend to a character infected with a treatable disease. Every time the diseased character makes a saving throw against disease effects (after the initial contamination), the treating character first makes a Treat Injury check to help the diseased character fend off secondary damage. This activity takes 10 minutes. If the treating character’s check succeeds, the treating character provides a bonus on the diseased character’s saving throw equal to his or her ranks in this skill.
Treat Poison (DC 15): A character can tend to a poisoned character. When a poisoned character makes a saving throw against a poison’s secondary effect, the treating character first makes a Treat Injury check as an attack action. If the treating character’s check succeeds, the character provides a bonus on the poisoned character’s saving throw equal to his or her ranks in this skill.
Try Again?: Yes, for restoring hit points, reviving dazed, stunned, or unconscious characters, stabilizing dying characters, and surgery. No, for all other uses of the skill.
Special: The Surgery feat gives a character the extra training he or she needs to use Treat Injury to help a wounded character by means of an operation. A character can take 10 when making a Treat Injury check. A character can take 20 only when restoring hit points or attempting to revive dazed, stunned, or unconscious characters. Long-term care, restoring hit points, treating disease, treating poison, or stabilizing a dying character requires a medical kit. Reviving a dazed, stunned, or unconscious character requires either a first aid kit or a medical kit. Surgery requires a surgery kit. If the character does not have the appropriate kit, he or she takes a –4 penalty on the check.
A character can use the Treat Injury skill on his or herself only to restore hit points, treat disease, or treat poison. The character takes a –5 penalty on your check any time he or she treats his or herself.
A character with the Medical Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Treat Injury checks.
Time: Treat Injury checks take different amounts of time based on the task at hand, as described above.